consequences of imperfect fertility control for children"s survival, health, and schooling



Publisher: Macro International Inc. in Calverton, Md

Written in English
Published: Pages: 65 Downloads: 79
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Places:

  • Developing countries

Subjects:

  • Child welfare -- Developing countries -- Statistics.,
  • Fertility, Human -- Developing countries -- Statistics.,
  • Birth control -- Developing countries -- Statistics.

Edition Notes

StatementMark R. Montgomery ... [et al.].
SeriesDemographic and Health Surveys analytical reports ;, no. 7
ContributionsMontgomery, Mark, 1953-, Macro International. Demographic and Health Surveys.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV804 .C66 1997
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 65 p. :
Number of Pages65
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL493686M
LC Control Number98226184
OCLC/WorldCa39899331

Specifically, female education has powerful effects on the total fertility rate (and hence on population growth), the infant mortality rate, (10) the female disadvantage in child survival, and on child health and nutrition. By contrast, statistical analyses show that male schooling has relatively much smaller effects on these important social.   Using data from Demographic and Health Surveys, Liliana Andriano and Christiaan Monden show that, everything else equal, each additional year of maternal schooling reduces children’s probability of dying before age 5 by about 10% in Malawi and by almost 17% in Uganda.. Child survival is a key indicator of social development and remains a serious challenge for developing countries. Parental Education and Child’s Education: A Natural Experiment∗ Is the intergenerational educational link due to nature or nurture? In order to answer this dilemma, this paper identifies the effect of parental education on their offspring’s schooling attainment using a discontinuity in the parental educational attainment. The discontinuity. The consequences of imperfect fertility control for children’s survival, health, and schooling, DHS Analytical Reports, Calverton, MD, USA: Macro International, , No. 7. Marston C and Cleland J, Do unintended pregnancies carried to term lead to adverse outcomes for mother and child?

  The model is applied to Nigeria under scenarios of slow and rapid fertility decline in order to ascertain the potential economic gain from more rapid decline. This is an extension of earlier work (Ashraf, Weil, and Wilde ), with the important addition of feedback effects of fertility decline on human capital formation (health, schooling Cited by: 6. Suggested Citation:"2 Female Education and Fertility: Examining the Links."National Research Council. Critical Perspectives on Schooling and Fertility in the Developing gton, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / Women's education in developing countries: barriers, benefits, and policies (English) Abstract. Despite the great expansion of educational opportunities worldwide during the past thirty years, women in most developing countries still receive less schooling than by:   Children conceived through fertility treatment like IVF are one third more likely to have psychiatric problems such as autism or schizophrenia than those born naturally, research suggests.

  The World Economic Forum is an independent international organization committed to improving the state of the world by engaging business, political, academic and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. Incorporated as a not-for-profit foundation in , and headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, the Forum is tied to no political, partisan or national interests. WOMEN'S STATUS AND DEMOGRAPHIC BEHAVIORResearch on many aspects of population change in the contemporary world has highlighted the significance of relationships between women's status and demographic behavior. In particular, knowledge of these relationships has been important in understanding demographic transition, increasing the complexity of the classical depiction in which fertility. child health and fertility (Strauss and Thomas, ). The effect of parental education on fertility and child health is widely investigated in terms of the correlations, which, of course, do not imply causality. Therefore, it is important to examine both the determinants.   Almost universally, women with higher levels of education have fewer children. Better education is associated with lower mortality, better health, and different migration patterns. Hence, the global population outlook depends greatly on further progress in education, particularly of young women. By , the highest and lowest education scenarios—assuming identical education-specific Cited by:

consequences of imperfect fertility control for children"s survival, health, and schooling Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control for Children's Survival, Health, and Schooling (PDF, K) Order a Hard Copy: Please use electronic copies of DHS publications whenever possible. Hardcopies of publications are intended primarily for those in developing countries where internet connections are limited or by: The Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control for Children's Survival, Health and Schooling [AR7] Author: CPY Document Author Subject: CPY Document Subject Keywords: USAID, Macro International Inc.

Calverton, Maryland, USA Created Date: 3/6/ PM. The consequences of imperfect fertility control for children's survival, health, and schooling. Author(s): Montgomery,Mark, Title(s): The consequences of imperfect fertility control for children's survival, health, and schooling/ Mark R.

Montgomery. The Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control for Children’s Survival, Health, and Schooling. Calverton, MD: Macro International ; Demographic and Health Cited by:   Unintended fertility and investments in children’s human capital: The Bangladesh case.

Paper presented in the Annual Conference of the Population Association of Cited by: As a consequence of information accumulated by the World Fertility Surveys and more recently by the Demographic and Health Surveys, a great deal has been learned over the past 20 years regarding the linkages between fertility and health in developing by: NBER Program(s):Economics of Education, Children.

This paper takes advantage of a massive school construction program that took place in Indonesia between and to estimate the effect of education on fertility and child mortality. When the educational attainment of children is regressed against mother™s fertility, mother™s age, and child™s age, the results show that there is a small negative correlation, although it is not as large as one might expect.

However, once additional variables are included in the regression, which also have the potential to affect the File Size: KB.

focused on the consequences of twins, the sex composition of initial births, and subsidies to local family planning, all of which may impact fertility independently of desired fertility and affect other family outcomes, such as the mother’s market labor supply, and the health and schooling of her Size: KB.

Our results suggest that imperfect fertility control significantly influences both the average schooling attainment and birthweight of children in Malaysia, with couples having above-average propensities to conceive reporting higher levels of actual fertility, significantly lower expectations of and actual schooling attainment for their children, and lower birthweight children, on average, due to smaller intervals.

The term ‘ fertility control ’ can be taken to refer to any or all of the proximate determinants. However, while marriage patterns clearly affect fertility, it is often thought that marriage behavior is motivated and explained by factors that are not related directly to a desire to control fertility.

Read "The Consequences of Unintended Pregnancy for Maternal and Child Health in Rural India: Evidence from Prospective Data, Maternal and Child Health Journal" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of. Female education and its impact on fertility The relationship is more complex than one may think Keywords: female education, fertility, demand for children, fertility control costs, returns to education, family planning KEY FinDingS AuThoR’S mAin mESSAgECited by: 2.

fertility. Since the choice of schooling is not random, however, the question of whether this correlation is causal remains open. In this paper, I use US Census data, along with information on compulsory attendance and child labor laws that affected women’s schooling choices in their teenage years, to estimate the effect of education on.

B.S. Okun, in International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences, The term ‘fertility control’ can be taken to refer to any or all of the proximate determinants.

However, while marriage patterns clearly affect fertility, it is often thought that marriage behavior is motivated and explained by factors that are not related directly to a desire to control fertility.

Imperfect fertility control and child mortality and morbidity pose addi-tional constraints on family fertility behavior and add further dimensions to family choice. (7) Finally, there are difficulties in defining the appro-priate unit of analysis. Decisions to have children and decisions concerningCited by: Downloadable.

The paper analyzes villages in Matlab, Bangladesh from toin which half the villages received from to a door-to-door outreach family planning and maternal-child health program. Village and individual data confirm a decline in fertility of about 15 percent in the program villages compared with the control villages byas others have noted, which.

Determinants and consequences of high fertility: a synopsis of the evidence - portfolio review (English) Abstract. In the six decades sincefertility has fallen substantially in developing countries. Even so, high fertility, defined as five or more births per woman over the reproductive career, characterizes 33 countries.

In this paper, we present new evidence on the effect of female education on fertility and infant health in the United States using school entry policies as an instrument for education. In particular, we exploit the fact that the year in which a person starts Cited by: The results showed that children's level of schooling had a positive direct effect on their cognitive ability, while the direct effects of adult fertility rate and child mortality were Author: Sudhanshu Handa.

The Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control for Children’s Survival, Health and Schooling, Demographic and Health Surveys Analytical Report Series No viii +.

Inwhen he and Melinda first ventured into public health they focused on birth control, funding a Johns Hopkins effort to use computers. The consequences of imperfect fertility control for children’s survival, health, and schooling,” ().

The effect of household wealth on educational attainment:Author: Mark R. Montgomery and Paul C. Hewett. The consequences, for the child and the family, of unintended pregnancies that are carried to term have also attracted research interest both in the United States and in developing countries.

Rosenzweig, Mark R., and T. Paul Schultz, "Fertility and Investments in Human Capital--Estimates of the Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control in Malaysia," Journal of Econometrics, Vol. 36, No., pp. Similarly, the probability of survival of a child will depend on choices made by parents as well as on environmental conditions outside their control.

Imperfect fertility control and child mortality and morbidity pose addi-tional constraints on family fertility behavior and. A framework is set out for estimating the effects of interventions on child health that considers changes in the allocation of family resources, who among children survive (survival selectivity.

Demographic Effects of Girls’ Education in Developing Countries Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief. Educating girls is a universally accepted strategy for improving lives and advancing development.

This "Cited by" count includes citations to the following articles in Scholar. The consequences of imperfect fertility control for children's survival, health, and schooling. MR Montgomery, CB Lloyd, PC Hewett, P Heuveline.

DHS. Analytical Reports. Montgomery, Mark R., Cynthia B. Lloyd, Paul C. Hewett and Patrick Heuveline () “The consequences of imperfect fertility control for children’s survival, health and schooling.The Effects of Schooling on Costless Health Maintenance: Overweight Adolescents and Children in Rural China Estimates of the Consequences of Imperfect Fertility Control in Malaysia Bulletins, The Behavior of Mothers as Inputs to Child Health: The Determinants of Birth Weight, Gestation, and Rate of Fetal Growth.

With positive signals for fertility decline emerging in sub-Saharan Africa, and development economists debating the potential for African countries to see a “demographic dividend,” it’s a good time to look more closely at the data linking female education and childbearing.

In a nutshell, data show that the higher the level of a woman’s educational attainment, the fewer children she is.